The Canonical Orthodox Old Roman Catholic

CLERICAL DIRECTORY

CANONICAL ORTHODOX OLD ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS

The following bishops are signatories to "The Walsingham Declaration" and adhere to and maintain the doctrinal position of the historical Old Roman Catholic Church of the Netherlands and Monsingor A H Mathew, as stated in the dogmatic articles agreed with the holy See of St Peter at Antioch in 1911; preserving the one holy Catholic and Apostolic Faith free from erroneous dogmas unsubstantiated neither by Tradition nor Scripture.

NAME

CONSECRATION

JURISDICTION

POSITION

2012 25 November by Mgr Jerome Lloyd

1991 03 April by Mgr Carl Howard

2012 05 May by Mgr Boniface Grosvold

2012 15 October by Mgr Boniface Grosvold

2002 19 Oct by Mgr Boniface Grosvold

1994 13 August by Mgr Douglas T Lewins

Emeritus

Metropolitan

Metropolitan

Metropolitan

Emeritus

Auxiliary

The following are bishops of jurisdictions that have maintained canonical structures and maintain the doctrinal position of the historical Old Roman Catholic Church of the Netherlands with, or who have received, direct lineal descent from Mgr Mathew.

NAME

ADAMS Raphael J

AMADEO Luke

FACIONE Francis P

FORD Edward J

FUCCI David B

GANNON Beldon E
HALL Bobby C

HERNANDEZ Chris M

KING Patrick H

PERSYN David P P

PLANT Irvin Nicholas

PLEAU Henry

RĂ–GGLA Jonas

WALDERS Charles

WHITE Charles S J

WOOD Irvine N 

VELLONE Joseph Andrew

CONSECRATION

1989 04 February by Mgr Francis P Facione

1994 04 October by Mgr Edgar Ramon Verostek

1974 30 November by Mgr A G Johnston-Cantrell

1978 30 May by Mgr Jame E Burns

2013 21 April by Mgr Boniface Grosvold

1985 11 May by Mgr Edward J Ford

2015 14 September by Mgr Joseph Vellone

1989 ?? by Mgr Joseph Vellone? 

1993 05 June by Mgr Francis P Facione

2014 09 August by Mgr Charles Walders

2011 15 October by Mgr Edward T Ford

1974 21 September by Mgr Walter Xavier Brown

2012 25 November by Mgr Jerome Lloyd

2013 15 October by Mgr Henry Pleau

1994 by Mgr Joseph Andrew Lawrence Vellone

TBA

1985 10 August by Mgr Edgar Ramon Verostek

COMMUNITY

POSITION

Emeritus

Diocesan

Diocesan

Metropolitan

Ordinary

Diocesan

Auxilliary
Co-adjutor

Emeritus

Co-adjutor

Diocesan

Emeritus

Emeritus

Metropolitan

TBA

TBA

Metropolitan

N.B. For information pertaining to bishops of the Pro-Uniate Rite persuasion, click here

In the Catholic Church, a bishop is an ordained minister who holds the fullness of the sacrament of Holy Orders and is responsible for teaching doctrine, governing Catholics in his jurisdiction, and sanctifying the world and for representing the Church. Catholics trace the origins of the office of bishop to the apostles, who were endowed with a special charism by the Holy Spirit at Pentecost. Catholics believe this special charism has been transmitted through an unbroken succession of bishops by the laying on of hands in the sacrament of Holy Orders.

Diocesan bishops — known as eparchs in the Eastern Catholic Churches — are assigned to govern local regions within the Church known as dioceses in the Latin Church and eparchies in the Eastern Rites. Bishops are collectively known as the College of Bishops and can hold such additional titles as archbishop, metropolitan or primate.

Two classes of bishops must be distinguished, not with regard to the power of order, for all bishops receive the fullness of the priesthood but with regard to the power of jurisdiction: the diocesan bishop and the titular bishop or, as he was called before 1882 the episcopus in partibus infedelium. The former is here considered. Those belonging to the second class cannot perform any episcopal function without the authorization of the diocesan bishop; for as titular bishops they have no ordinary jurisdiction. They can; however, act as auxiliary bishops, i.e. they may be appointed to assist a diocesan bishop in the exercise of duties arising from the episcopal order but entailing no power of jurisdiction. (See AUXILIARY BISHOP.) Such a bishop is also called vicarius in pontificalibus, i.e. a representative in certain ceremonial acts proper to the diocesan bishop, sometimes suffragan bishop, episcopus suffraganeus. In the proper sense of the term, however, the suffragan bishop is the diocesan bishop in his relations with the metropolitan of the ecclesiastical province to which he belongs, while the bishop who is independent of any metropolitan is called an exempt bishop, episcopus exemptus. The titular bishop may also be coadjutor bishop when he is appointed to assist an ordinary bishop in the administration of the diocese. Sometimes he is incorrectly called auxiliary bishop. He possesses some powers of jurisdiction determined by the letters Apostolic appointing him. Often also, notably in missionary countries, the coadjutor bishop is named cum jure successionis, i.e. with the right of succession; on the death of the diocesan bishop he enters on the ordinary administration of the diocese.

The Council of Trent determined the conditions to be fulfilled by candidates for the episcopate, of which the following are the principal: birth in lawful wedlock, freedom from censure and irregularity or any defect in mind, purity of personal morals, and good reputation. The candidate must also be fully thirty years of age and have been not less than six months in Holy orders. He ought also to have the theological degree of Doctor or at least be a licentiate in theology or canon law or else have the testimony of a public academy or seat of learning (or, if he be a religious, of the highest authority of his order) that he is fit to teach others (c. vii, De electione et electi potestate, X.I. vi; Friedberg, II, 51. Council of Trent. Sess. XXII, De ref., ch. ii).